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Methodology | Best for Vets: Franchises 2016

September 14, 2015 (Photo Credit: John Harman/Staff)

We invited franchise brands across the country to fill out a rigorous survey, including more than 100 questions, about their companies as well as their accommodations for troops and veterans.

The rankings were created based on the answers provided to questions about company culture, the performance of franchise units, the costs associated with franchising, and financial and other support offered to current and former service members and their families.

We also considered information in franchise disclosure documents provided by the companies. Unless otherwise noted, data on initial investment and royalty costs, as well as overall continuity and growth rates, comes from franchise disclosure documents.

All other chart information, including veteran-specific continuity and growth rates, comes from company survey responses, unless otherwise noted.

Not everything listed in the chart was considered in developing the rankings, and many items not listed were considered.

Industry categories are courtesy of CareerBuilder.com.

3-year continuity rate shows the franchise units open at the end of the year as a percentage of the units open at the start of the year, plus the units that began operating that year. The percentage shown is an average of the calculation over the three most recent years available, unless otherwise noted. While franchises can cease operations for reasons other than business failure, lower percentages may be a cause for concern.

3-year growth rate shows the percentage increase or decrease annually in the number of franchises, averaged over the three most recent years for which data is available.

Initial investment shows the range of the total investment, including initial franchise fees and other startup costs, that franchisees typically must pay. This amount can vary depending on type and number of franchises.

Royalty discount shows the dollar amount or percentage that royalties, or similar ongoing fees paid to franchise brands, are discounted for veterans. Dashes indicate that companies told us they have these costs but there is no veteran discount; “no fee” means no franchisees must pay this type of cost, regardless of veteran status.

Reservist help shows the assistance that franchise brands provide to members of the National Guard or reserves who are called to active duty.

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