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We considered some 180 substantially complete responses to this year's Best for Vets: Business Schools survey and listed the top 77. Only institutions that participated in our detailed Best for Vets: Colleges survey and offer graduate business degrees were considered. To create the rankings, we scored schools' survey responses to both the Business Schools survey and parts of the Colleges survey, based on what veterans have told us is important to them as well as on our own editorial judgment. We also factored in data from the Veterans Affairs and Defense departments, as well as three Education Department sources: the IPEDS Data Center, College Scorecard data and the Cohort Default Rate Database.

Overall, schools were evaluated in five categories: university culture, student support, academic outcomes and quality, academic policies, and cost and financial aid. The value of each section was comparable, but university culture and student support counted the most, and financial aid counted the least. Many factors other than those listed in the chart were considered to develop the rankings.

Fall 2015 enrollment data show the number of students enrolled in graduate business programs in the fall 2015 semester, as reported by the schools, except where otherwise indicated. Military enrollment figures are measured similarly and apply to service members and veterans tracked by a school, not just students using military-related benefits, except where otherwise indicated.

At or below TA cap means graduate business programs did not exceed the limit of $250 per credit hour for most military tuition assistance in the 2014-15 school year.

Charged at or below Post-9/11 limits means a school indicated that no Post-9/11 GI Bill recipient in graduate business programs at the school, eligible at the 100 percent level, was charged a tuition rate above what the Post-9/11 GI Bill covered in the 2014-15 school year. Public schools must waive out-of-state tuition rates for this to be the case; private schools must not exceed the $20,235.02 cap.

Yellow Ribbon rates a school's participation in the Yellow Ribbon program, under which a school and the Veterans Affairs Department partner to partially or completely make up the difference between a school's tuition rate and the amount covered by the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Schools with "n/a" indicated that Post-9/11 fully covered their tuition costs, so Yellow Ribbon was not needed. Stars are awarded based on the proportion of students receiving Yellow Ribbon scholarships and the value of those awards. Best rating = 4 stars.

Accepts ACE-recommended credits means the business school accepts at least some graduate academic credits for military training as recommended by the American Council on Education.

Staff support rates the number of staff members dedicated to veterans issues as a proportion of a school's military and veteran population, the amount of time the staffers spend on veterans issues and the scope and frequency of military-related training for teachers and administrators. Staff help at both the business school and the larger university are considered.

Academic support rates the types of academic help provided, such as tutoring, mentors and learning communities, and also considers whether there is a separate version of these types of support for veterans. Support at both the business school and larger university are evaluated. The ratings also consider a business school's withdrawal and re-enrollment policies for deployed service members.

Average GMAT shows the average Graduate Management Admission Test scores for applicants to the school for the fall 2015 semester, as reported by the school. Schools without scores either did not consider, or did not provide us information on, the GMAT scores of applicants.

Military course completion shows the rate at which graduate military and veteran students at the business school earn academic credit for the courses they attempt, as reported by schools in our survey based on the most-recent-available data.

Military retention shows the proportion of a business school's graduate military and veteran students who, after starting at a school, returned to classes for the following fall semester, as reported by schools in our survey based on the most-recent-available data.

Military graduation shows the proportion of a business school's graduate military and veteran students who graduated within 150 percent of the expected completion time for the degrees they pursued, as reported by schools in our survey based on the most-recent-available data. For example, a student in a two-year MBA program would need to graduate within three years to count as graduating.

Overall institution policy agreements columns show which of three major military and veteran education agreements the larger college or university — not just the business school — has signed on to: the Principles of Excellence, 8 Keys to Veterans' Success and the most recent Defense Department Memorandum of Understanding.

Overall institution military course completion shows the rate at which military and veteran students at the larger college or university — not just graduate business programs — earn academic credit for the courses they attempt, as reported by schools in our Best for Vets: Colleges survey based on the most-recent-available data.

Overall institution retention rate data shows the proportion of a school's students who, after starting at a school, returned to classes for the following fall semester, as applies to the entire college or university — not just the business school — and based on the most-recent-available data. The total rate comes from Education Department data and includes only first-time freshmen, both full-time and part-time. The military rate comes from schools reporting the data in our Best for Vets: Colleges survey and includes both freshmen and transfer students in their first semester at the school. Among all schools tracked by the Education Department, the retention rate for first-time, full-time students starting in 2012 and continuing in 2013, the most recent years for which data is available, was 80 percent at four-year schools.

Overall institution graduation rate data shows the proportion of a school's students who graduated within 150 percent of the expected completion time for the degrees they pursued, as applies to the entire college or university — not just the business school — and based on the most-recent-available data. The total rate comes from Education Department data and includes only first-time, full-time students, a category into which current and former service members rarely fall. However, the rate can provide some indication of academic success for the general student population. For schools that reported the information, the number in parentheses is the transfer-out rate for the same time frame, which, if added to the graduation rate, may give a more accurate representation of student success. The military rate comes from schools reporting the data in our Bets for Vets: Colleges survey and is not limited to first-time, full-time students. Among all four-year schools tracked by the Education Department, the average graduation rate was 54 percent for students graduating by 2014, the most recent year for which data is available.

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