Anne Flaherty, The Associated Press

  • Former CIA director john Brennan testifies at the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on May 23, 2017, in Washington. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
    Brennan: Trump worked with Russians and now he’s desperate

    Former CIA Director John Brennan said Thursday that President Donald Trump yanked his security clearance because his campaign colluded with the Russians to sway the 2016 election and is now desperate to end the special counsel’s investigation.

  • Trump nomination to lead State picks up support in Senate

    Rex Tillerson, the former Exxon Mobil executive with close business ties to Russia, saw his prospects of becoming secretary of state brighten Sunday after gaining the support of two influential Republican senators who had wavered on the nomination.

  • FILE - In this April 28, 2015 file photo, students wait outside Everest College in Industry, Calif., hoping to get their transcriptions and information on loan forgiveness and transferring credits to other schools. Almost 12,000 students are asking the federal government to discharge their college loan debt, asserting that their school either closed or lied to them about job prospects, according to government data released Thursday. The figure represents an unprecedented spike in what's called a
    About 12,000 seek student loan relief

    Thousands of students asked the federal government to discharge their college loan debt, asserting that their school either closed or lied to them about job prospects, according to government data.

  • FILE - In this May 13, 2015 file photo, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore, speaks during an interview with the Associated Press in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington. Wyden, a skeptic of broad government surveillance, objected Tuesday to a bill that would have required social media and online sites like Google, Yahoo, Twitter and Facebook to alert federal authorities of any terrorist activity. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
    Senator objects to anti-terrorism rules for online sites

    Sen. Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat and skeptic of broad government surveillance, objected Tuesday to a bill that would have required social media and online sites like Google, Yahoo, Twitter and Facebook to alert federal authorities of any terrorist activity.

  • This photo taken Nov. 7, 2013 shows Education Secretary Arne Duncan speaking Malcolm X Elementary School in Washington. Duncan continued to face criticism Monday over reported remarks that seemed to dismiss “white suburban moms” for opposing higher academic standards. Duncan has consistently shown little patience for critics of the Common Core State Standards, being implemented in 45 states and the District of Columbia. But his remarks, as reported by Politico, went a step further and add elements of race and class. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
    For-profit college loan rules upheld

    A federal judge ruled the Education Department has the right to demand that schools show their graduates make enough money to repay their student loans.

  • WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 27: U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan speaks to students at School Without Walls August 27, 2013 in Washington, DC. Duncan participated in an event to discuss
    Corinthian students' debt problem eased

    An Education Department plan expands debt relief to students who attended a now-closed school as far back as a year ago.

  • TOPSHOTS A Shiite Huthi rebel threatens Yemeni protesters during a rally against the control of the capital by Huthi rebels on January 24, 2015 in the capital Sanaa. Thousands of Yemenis took to the streets of Sanaa in the largest demonstration against Huthis since the Shiite militiamen overran the capital in September.
    Obama: Counterterrorism operations in Yemen not affected

    President Obama defended his counterterrorism strategy in tumultuous Yemen Sunday, as influential lawmakers from both parties suggested the U.S. may need to turn to special operations forces to root out terrorists from the Middle Eastern nation and elsewhere in the region.

  • In this photo taken Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, in Evanston, Ill., Northwestern University freshman Halle Lukasiewicz, poses for a portrait in a campus classroom. Fall for many high school seniors means deciding where to apply for college and maybe a trip to a guidance counselor. Lukasiewicz, 18, remembers vividly the day Northwestern University began emailing acceptance letters. A chatroom devoted to Northwestern hopefuls on a site called “College Confidential” was buzzing. The popularity of social media sites and advancements in analyzing lots of data we put online mean today’s high school seniors have more tools than ever to help them find the right college, though it’s still an inexact science. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
    Picking a college with data crunchers

    WASHINGTON – The popularity of social media sites and advancements in the ability to analyze the vast amounts of dat...