Paul Schemm

  • A police investigator walks in front of the Hotel Etoile du Sud in Grand Bassam, Ivory Coast, on March 14, 2016, a day after jihadist attackers stormed three hotels in the weekend resort. Ivory Coast ministers were to hold emergency talks on March 14 after the first jihadist attack in the country left 18 dead at a beach resort popular with foreigners, the latest such Islamist assault in West Africa. It was the third such attack in four months in West Africa and a blow to a nation working to lure back foreign tourists to its palm-fringed beaches and rainforests as it recovers from a brutal civil war. / AFP / ISSOUF SANOGO (Photo credit should read ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images)
    Al-Qaida focuses attention on soft targets in West Africa

    ADDIS ABABA, EthiopiaThe attack on an Ivory Coast beach resort by an al-Qaida affiliate is the latest sign it is shifting its focus to soft targets associated with foreigners in an effort to destabilize economies and gain the group credibility among

  • Security forces, officials and civilians gather outside of the Imam Sadiq Mosque after a deadly blast struck after Friday prayers in Kuwait City, Kuwait, Friday, June 26, 2015. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for what appears to be a bombing that targeted the Shiite mosque. (AP Photo)
    Dozens killed in attacks in Tunisia, Kuwait and France

    A young man pulled a Kalashnikov from a beach umbrella and sprayed gunfire at European sunbathers at a Tunisian resort, killing at least 37 people — one of three deadly attacks Friday from Europe to North Africa to the Middle East that followed a call to violence by Islamic State extremists.

  • An image grab taken from the Huthi rebel television station Al-Masira shows Yemeni tribesmen celebrating around the wreckage of a plane bearing a Moroccan flag, in the the Wadi Nushur area in the north Yemen's province of Saada, on May 11, 2015. Yemeni rebels said they shot down a fighter jet as Saudi-led coalition air strikes intensified a day ahead of a hoped-for five-day humanitarian truce. Morocco announced that one of its warplanes taking part in operations against the rebels was missing along with its pilot, and that a search was underway. AFP PHOTO / HO / Al-MASIRA TV=== RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT
    Moroccan warplane apparently downed in Yemen

    Shiite rebels in Yemen claimed Monday to have shot down a Moroccan F-16 fighter jet taking part in a Saudi-led coalition targeting them and their allies, just a day before a five-day humanitarian cease-fire was set to begin.

  • In this photo taken Thursday, April 2, 2015, Shiite militiamen guard a street in Tikrit, Iraq. Iraqi government forces drove the Islamic State group out of Abu Mustafa’s hometown of Tikrit over a month ago, but he has yet to return, fearing the Shiite militias that now patrol its bombed and battered streets. (AP Photo/Khalid Mohammed)
    Iraqi city still a ghost town a month after defeat of IS

    Iraqi government forces drove the Islamic State group out of Abu Mustafa's hometown of Tikrit over a month ago, but he has yet to return, fearing the Shiite militias that now patrol its bombed and battered streets.

  • In this Sunday, April 26, 2015 photo, Iraqi security forces prepare to attack Islamic State group militants, during an operation to retake the water control station on a canal lost over the weekend, in the town of Garma, between Baghdad and the Islamic State-held city of Fallujah, Iraq. Defense Minister Khalid al-Obeidi said on Iraqi television that the army has achieved
    Iraq faces challenges dislodging IS in Anbar

    Iraqi forces are on a westward push to retake Anbar, a sprawling Sunni-dominated desert province captured by the Islamic State group in their offensive last year.

  • In this Dec. 5, 2014 photo, Ibrahim Doghri smokes a cigarette in his low-income neighborhood of Mhamdiya near Tunis, Tunisia, as he talks about how his friends went to fight in Syria. While foreigners from across the world have joined the Islamic State militant group, some arrive in Iraq or Syria only to find day-to-day life much more austere and violent than they had expected. These disillusioned new recruits soon discover that it is a lot harder to leave the Islamic State than to join. (AP Photo/Paul Schemm)
    The cost of leaving Islamic State: Death or jail

    While foreigners from across the world have joined the Islamic State militant group, some arrive in Iraq or Syria only to find day-to-day life much more austere and violent than they had expected.