The Twitterverse exploded on Tuesday morning when a fake Twitter account purportedly belonging to Ashton Carter, the presumptive nominee to become the Pentagon's next chief, falsely claimed that he had landed the job.

Gen. John Campbell takes part in a change of command ceremony on March 2, 2016, at Camp Resolute Support in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Staff Sgt. Tony Coronado/Air Force)
Gen. John Campbell takes part in a change of command ceremony on March 2, 2016, at Camp Resolute Support in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Staff Sgt. Tony Coronado/Air Force)

The tweet appeared to confirm a CNN story that President Obama had decided to nominate Carter to replace current Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, so some national security reporters were fooled.

This photo taken on Thursday, May 8, 2014 shows the remains of the World War I German Lange Max gun in Koekelare, Belgium. The gun was originally designed to be a naval gun, but was later adapted as a railroad gun which was capable of long range. A century on, the four seasons bring constant changes to the scarred landscapes and ruins of the World War I battlefields in Belgium and northern France, yet many of the relics still exist, both above and below the surface. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
This photo taken on Thursday, May 8, 2014 shows the remains of the World War I German Lange Max gun in Koekelare, Belgium. The gun was originally designed to be a naval gun, but was later adapted as a railroad gun which was capable of long range. A century on, the four seasons bring constant changes to the scarred landscapes and ruins of the World War I battlefields in Belgium and northern France, yet many of the relics still exist, both above and below the surface. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

But others noticed that the purported Ashton Carter tweet did not seem Kosher.

This photo taken on Thursday, May 8, 2014 shows the remains of the World War I German Lange Max gun in Koekelare, Belgium. The gun was originally designed to be a naval gun, but was later adapted as a railroad gun which was capable of long range. A century on, the four seasons bring constant changes to the scarred landscapes and ruins of the World War I battlefields in Belgium and northern France, yet many of the relics still exist, both above and below the surface. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
This photo taken on Thursday, May 8, 2014 shows the remains of the World War I German Lange Max gun in Koekelare, Belgium. The gun was originally designed to be a naval gun, but was later adapted as a railroad gun which was capable of long range. A century on, the four seasons bring constant changes to the scarred landscapes and ruins of the World War I battlefields in Belgium and northern France, yet many of the relics still exist, both above and below the surface. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

And more than a few noticed that whomever tweeted as Carter used the British spelling for "honoured."

Sikorsky's S-97 Raider in flight. Photo courtesy of Sikorsky/Lockheed Martin
Sikorsky's S-97 Raider in flight. Photo courtesy of Sikorsky/Lockheed Martin

In the end, the bogus Tweeter fessed up.

This photo taken on Thursday, May 8, 2014 shows the remains of the World War I German Lange Max gun in Koekelare, Belgium. The gun was originally designed to be a naval gun, but was later adapted as a railroad gun which was capable of long range. A century on, the four seasons bring constant changes to the scarred landscapes and ruins of the World War I battlefields in Belgium and northern France, yet many of the relics still exist, both above and below the surface. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
This photo taken on Thursday, May 8, 2014 shows the remains of the World War I German Lange Max gun in Koekelare, Belgium. The gun was originally designed to be a naval gun, but was later adapted as a railroad gun which was capable of long range. A century on, the four seasons bring constant changes to the scarred landscapes and ruins of the World War I battlefields in Belgium and northern France, yet many of the relics still exist, both above and below the surface. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

Or did he?

Sikorsky's S-97 Raider in flight. Photo courtesy of Sikorsky/Lockheed Martin
Sikorsky's S-97 Raider in flight. Photo courtesy of Sikorsky/Lockheed Martin