Controlling temperature suit

An advanced wetsuit designed for NASA’s next-generation space suit could have military applications both in and out of the water.

Allen Williams, senior engineer for the company Oceaneering, explained features of the Liquid Thermal Garment to Military Times at the recent National Defense Industrial Association’s annual Special Operation Forces Industry Conference.

The suit uses water, which is either heated or cooled through a device that can run off a variety of power sources. It circulates the water, keeping the wearer cool or warming them up.

The Liquid Thermal Garment developed by the company Oceaneering was originally developed for NASA's next-generation space suit. But the company also sees military applications for it, especially for combat divers and any personnel involved in amphibious missions. (Oceaneering)
The Liquid Thermal Garment developed by the company Oceaneering was originally developed for NASA's next-generation space suit. But the company also sees military applications for it, especially for combat divers and any personnel involved in amphibious missions. (Oceaneering)

The suit can plug into power on a ship, underwater swimmer delivery vehicle, or even on dry land — such as inside a tank or fighting vehicle in cold or hot weather operations.