It's the souvenir of a lifetime, and the Internet is just the scrapbook.

Military pilots stateside and abroad have been capturing their best flight selfies with cameras — mainly GoPros — in the cockpit, giving audiences a glimpse of what it's like on high.

While the Federal Aviation Administration has taken a stance on taking photos in the cockpit for commercial pilots, the Defense Department as a whole does not have a specific policy for GoPro cameras — small, mountable cameras used for action — or other selfie measures within its social media guidelines.

However the Air Force, per AFI 35-109, certifies and tests for electromagnetic interference on any camera that would go aboard military aircraft, said Air Force spokeswoman Capt. Brooke Brzozowske.

GoPro Hero, Hero2, Hero3, and some accessories are currently approved cameras, she said.

So far, it seems like pilots have taken selfies only during training exercises, not combat missions.

Here are some of the best pilot selfies and videos U.S. service members have to offer, and some from international military pilots, too.

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014 file photo, an artillery shell lays in the opening of a World War I bunker near Beaucamps-Ligny, France. Fifteen British WWI soldiers were re-buried at nearby Y Farm Commonwealth cemetery in Bois-Grenier, France on Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, nearly a century after they died in battle. The soldiers, who served with the 2nd Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment, were discovered in a field five years ago in Beaucamps Ligny and identified through a variety of means, including DNA. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014 file photo, an artillery shell lays in the opening of a World War I bunker near Beaucamps-Ligny, France. Fifteen British WWI soldiers were re-buried at nearby Y Farm Commonwealth cemetery in Bois-Grenier, France on Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, nearly a century after they died in battle. The soldiers, who served with the 2nd Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment, were discovered in a field five years ago in Beaucamps Ligny and identified through a variety of means, including DNA. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)

And watch him launch the missile here.

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014 file photo, an artillery shell lays in the opening of a World War I bunker near Beaucamps-Ligny, France. Fifteen British WWI soldiers were re-buried at nearby Y Farm Commonwealth cemetery in Bois-Grenier, France on Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, nearly a century after they died in battle. The soldiers, who served with the 2nd Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment, were discovered in a field five years ago in Beaucamps Ligny and identified through a variety of means, including DNA. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014 file photo, an artillery shell lays in the opening of a World War I bunker near Beaucamps-Ligny, France. Fifteen British WWI soldiers were re-buried at nearby Y Farm Commonwealth cemetery in Bois-Grenier, France on Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, nearly a century after they died in battle. The soldiers, who served with the 2nd Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment, were discovered in a field five years ago in Beaucamps Ligny and identified through a variety of means, including DNA. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)
In this photo taken on Friday, April 11, 2014, A wooden cross with a poppy is left at the World War I bomb crater named the
In this photo taken on Friday, April 11, 2014, A wooden cross with a poppy is left at the World War I bomb crater named the "Pool of Peace" in Heuvelland, Belgium. The crater was created by the largest of 19 mine explosions detonated to signal the start of the Messines phase of the Third Battle of Ypres. The explosion was set off on June 7, 1917 underneath one of the then highest German front-line positions on Messines Ridge. The sound of the 19 mine explosions was reportedly heard as faraway as London. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
In this photo taken on Friday, April 11, 2014, A wooden cross with a poppy is left at the World War I bomb crater named the
In this photo taken on Friday, April 11, 2014, A wooden cross with a poppy is left at the World War I bomb crater named the "Pool of Peace" in Heuvelland, Belgium. The crater was created by the largest of 19 mine explosions detonated to signal the start of the Messines phase of the Third Battle of Ypres. The explosion was set off on June 7, 1917 underneath one of the then highest German front-line positions on Messines Ridge. The sound of the 19 mine explosions was reportedly heard as faraway as London. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

OK, OK, we have some honorable mentions as well:

In this photo taken on Feb. 18, 2014, a World War I bunker is situated next to a modern house in Menen, Belgium. Many WWI and WWII bunkers in Belgium are protected by the heritage association and cannot be removed from the land. A century on, the four seasons bring constant changes to the scarred landscapes and ruins of the World War I battlefields in Belgium and northern France, yet many of the relics still exist, both above and below the surface. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
In this photo taken on Feb. 18, 2014, a World War I bunker is situated next to a modern house in Menen, Belgium. Many WWI and WWII bunkers in Belgium are protected by the heritage association and cannot be removed from the land. A century on, the four seasons bring constant changes to the scarred landscapes and ruins of the World War I battlefields in Belgium and northern France, yet many of the relics still exist, both above and below the surface. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
In this photo taken on Feb. 18, 2014, a World War I bunker is situated next to a modern house in Menen, Belgium. Many WWI and WWII bunkers in Belgium are protected by the heritage association and cannot be removed from the land. A century on, the four seasons bring constant changes to the scarred landscapes and ruins of the World War I battlefields in Belgium and northern France, yet many of the relics still exist, both above and below the surface. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
In this photo taken on Feb. 18, 2014, a World War I bunker is situated next to a modern house in Menen, Belgium. Many WWI and WWII bunkers in Belgium are protected by the heritage association and cannot be removed from the land. A century on, the four seasons bring constant changes to the scarred landscapes and ruins of the World War I battlefields in Belgium and northern France, yet many of the relics still exist, both above and below the surface. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
Members of 2nd Cavalry Regiment took part of a special live-fire range on Jan. 23, 2015. The range tested the Dragoons' cardio, accuracy, and ability to work with their weapons and equipment on the move. This is one of many exercises that will happen in their training rotation in Adazi, Latvia, for Operation Atlantic Resolve. (U.S. Army Photo - Pfc. Jaccob Hearn)
Members of 2nd Cavalry Regiment took part of a special live-fire range on Jan. 23, 2015. The range tested the Dragoons' cardio, accuracy, and ability to work with their weapons and equipment on the move. This is one of many exercises that will happen in their training rotation in Adazi, Latvia, for Operation Atlantic Resolve. (U.S. Army Photo - Pfc. Jaccob Hearn)
In this photo taken on Feb. 18, 2014, a World War I bunker is situated next to a modern house in Menen, Belgium. Many WWI and WWII bunkers in Belgium are protected by the heritage association and cannot be removed from the land. A century on, the four seasons bring constant changes to the scarred landscapes and ruins of the World War I battlefields in Belgium and northern France, yet many of the relics still exist, both above and below the surface. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
In this photo taken on Feb. 18, 2014, a World War I bunker is situated next to a modern house in Menen, Belgium. Many WWI and WWII bunkers in Belgium are protected by the heritage association and cannot be removed from the land. A century on, the four seasons bring constant changes to the scarred landscapes and ruins of the World War I battlefields in Belgium and northern France, yet many of the relics still exist, both above and below the surface. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

BONUS: Sometimes pilots go a little beyond, too. In 2013 this Marine fighter pilot delivered a best man speech for his brother's wedding while in the cockpit of a Harrier flying over Afghanistan.