Duffel Blog contributing writer Ron Gullekson, whose hilarious fake news stories delighted — and occasionally infuriated — thousands of visitors to the satirical web site, died suddenly Sunday after a short illness.

The former Navy cryptologic technician (interpretive) third class, who joined Duffel Blog in 2012, during its infancy, famously created an uproar when he wrote about a fake Defense Department ban on TapouT apparel for all troops. The story resulted in base officials fielding calls from worried or irate service members.

Or there's the one about the military's purported use of Microsoft PowerPoint to torture Taliban prisoners.

The list goes on and on.

"You're doing a good job if you fool a few people," Gullekson told Military Times in a 2012 interview.

Much like a patron saint of satire, most of the staff of the military humor site Duffel Blog never met Ron Gullekson.

Nevertheless, he left his fingerprints on the web site — and their lives.

Now, in the wake of his death Sunday, they're asking the public to help them pay his kindness forward and contribute to a GoFundMe page that a friend started to help ease the financial burden on his family following his illness and untimely that Gullekson's illness and death put on his family.

The former Navy cryptologic technician (interpretive) third class, language teacher and Duffel Blog contributor died from complications following an unexpected health crisis. He is survived by his wife, Jennifer, and his son, Zane.

The first public announcement came via Duffle Blog Editor-in-Chief Paul Szoldra's Facebook page.

The fundraising campaign was initially started to help cover his medical expenses, since he lacked Navy insurance, Paul Szoldra explained. After his passing, though, it was repurposed to also cover funeral costs.

Although the campaign is rooted in tragedy, Duffel Blog Editor Brian O'Rourke said it presents an opportunity to tangibly give back to the veteran community.

"This is a chance to take [those] … those, I  think, very often sincere expressions of thanks and translate them into concrete action for somebody who, you know, should still be making all of us laugh and … serving us at the same time," he said of Gullekson, who was a civilian defense contractor.

Mike Wailes, Gullekson's school roommate and Duffel Blog colleague, agreed.

"If you can help at all, there was never a more deserving Shipmate than Ron Gullekson," he told Military Times in an email.

You can view or donate to tThe GoFundMe page here. The page has already exceeded it's $10,000 goal.

The first public announcement came via Duffle Blog Editor-in-Chief Paul Szoldra's Facebook page.

Gullekson was one of the first writers to join the Duffel Blog team after its founding in 2012, Editor-in-Chief Paul Szoldra told Military Times.

"Ron was my favorite writer, hands down," he said. "I just loved his dry sarcasm."

Szoldra said that Gullekson, then working as an Army contractor in Stuttgart, Germany, an  emailed him in 2012 asking for a shot at writing for Duffel Blog. At the time, Gullekson was working as an Army contractor in Stuttgart, Germany.

"I have an English degree, but I’m not a d****e about it, and I wrote for my college’s newspaper," wrote Gullekson in the email, which Szoldra provided to Military Times, reads.

"I responded right back immediately," Szoldra said. "I just thought he was hilarious."

Gullekson produced proceeded to write parody pieces on everything from nerd awards studying at the Defense Language Institute, which he attended, to the return of scurvy in the Navy, all under the simple moniker "Ron." under the simple moniker of "Ron."

"The OPSEC was strong with him," quipped Duffel Blog Editor Brian O'Rourke, in reference to his pseudonym.

The standards he set helped build the Duffel Blog name and the team that created it.His example helped to build the Duffel Blog team.

"Some of hHis stories were some of the things that made me want to be a part of it," O’Rourke said.

But his friendship transcended the barriers of the digital workplace, colleagues say, with Facebook becoming a downtime hub where they kept upapace with his ups and downs, dedication to his family and adventures in civilian life with equal parts awe, respect and laughter.

"When he contributed to a conversation, he added something every time, whether it was a moment of levity when it was needed or a moment of support when that was needed," O'Rourke said.

Josh, a One Duffel Blog writer , Josh, (who goes by his first name here because he’s still on an active-duty, service member) said that Gullekson helped guide him through everything from job applications and picking college courses to learning German.

Mike Wailes, Gullekson’s school roommate and Duffel Blog colleague, agreedAnd Wailes, one of the only Duffel Blog staff members who knew Gullekson in person, said that he carried that compassion and humor into real life, too, calling him "one of the best friends" he ever made.

"He was extremely intelligent and had an almost supernatural knack for comedic timing," Wailes said, "So he would listen to your problems, and then give you genuine advice in a way that would crack you up, every time."

Despite penning now-iconic stories, building Duffel Blog stories (including one about the military’s purported use of Microsoft PowerPoint to torture Taliban prisoners), being a connoisseur of many tech-savvy friendships and creating LanguageSurfer.com, a website dedicated to learning helping users learn foreign languages called LanguageSurfer.com, everyone Military Times spoke to said his biggest legacy is that of a father.that the biggest legacy he leaves behind is that of being a fatherZane’s dad.

He leaves behind a wife, Jennifer, and his son, Zane.

"I never met him in person, but I could just tell from what he would post, from what other people would say about him, that his little boy was his life," Josh said. "That's what breaks my heart the most about this: that his son is without his father now."

While those who knew and loved Gullekson may remember him in different ways, they're united by a single wish: that the fundraiser wasn't necessary to begin with.

Now, in the wake of his death Sunday, they’re asking the public to help them pay his kindness forward and contribute to have started a GoFundMe page that a When Gullekson first fell ill, a friend started  a GoFundMe page to ease the financial burden on his family following his illness and untimely that Gullekson’s illness and death put on his family. That has now been repurposed to help cover funeral costs as well as medical costs.

The former Navy cryptologic technician (interpretive) third class, language teacher and Duffel Blog contributor died from complications following an unexpected health crisis. He is survived by his wife, Jennifer, and his son, Zane.

The first public announcement came via Duffle Blog Editor-in-Chief Paul Szoldra's Facebook page.

The fundraising campaign was initially started to help cover his medical expenses, since he lacked Navy insurance, Paul Szoldra explained. After his passing, though, it was repurposed to also cover funeral costs.

Although the campaign is rooted in tragedy, Duffel Blog Editor Brian O’Rourke said it presents an opportunity for the public to tangibly give back something tangible to the veteran community.

"This is a chance to take [those] … those, I  think, very often sincere expressions of thanks and translate them into concrete action for somebody who, you know, should still be making all of us laugh and … serving us at the same time," he said of Gullekson, who was a civilian defense contractor.

Mike Wailes, Gullekson’s school roommate and Duffel Blog colleague, agreed.

"If you can help at all, there was never a more deserving Shipmate than Ron Gullekson," he told Military Times in an email.

You can view or donate to tThe GoFundMe page here. The page has already exceeded it's $10,000 goal, but that's small solace.

"Everybody really doesn't want to do some GoFundMe," Szoldra said. "They just want Ron to wake up."