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Navy installations prepare for Hurricane Isaias as it works its way up the Atlantic Coast

Navy installations in Hampton Roads, Virginia, began preparations today as Hurricane Isaias has the potential to bring high winds and rain to the Mid-Atlantic coast as early as next week.

They are getting ready for destructive winds as high as almost 60 mph within 72 hours.

“Our current priority is twofold — keep our personnel and their families’ safe, and protect our Navy ships, assets and infrastructures from the storms’ potential impact as it makes its way up the coast,” said Rear Adm. Charles Rock, the Navy Region Mid-Atlantic commander in a press release.

The installations will be securing buildings, protecting equipment, moving small craft to safe havens, and more.

The hurricane is predicted to hit Florida as soon as Saturday.

“There is a risk of impacts from winds, heavy rainfall, and storm surge late this weekend from the northeastern Florida coast and spreading northward along the remainder of the U.S. east coast through early next week,” wrote the National Hurricane Center.

The Navy is urging personnel and families to:

*review their Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS) account, and visit the Know Your Zone website for information on whether you should evacuate in an emergency or shelter at home based on street address and the nature of the emergency event.

*visit the Ready Navy website and follow Twitter (@ReadyNavy). Ready Navy provides information, tools, including building hurricane preparedness kits, and resources that empower the Navy family to more aptly prepare for, react and recover when faced with any emergency. Please note: hurricane supply items, such as cleaning supplies and paper products, may be in short supply due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

The storm is expected to hit parts of Eastern North Carolina as early as Monday morning on its way up the East Coast and has already laid waste to parts of Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, causing flooding, power outages, and damages from high winds.

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