During an appearance on the “Full Send” podcast, Fox News’ Tucker Carlson recalled a recent discussion with a Stanford professor, who, 11 years ago, was allegedly tasked by the Defense Department to investigate numerous cases of troops dying due to UFO-inflicted brain injuries.

The polarizing host of “Tucker Carlson Tonight” shared that his source, who claimed to have expertise in traumatic brain injury, studied the brains of more than 100 troops who died following such encounters. The professor also told Carlson that there are dozens of open court cases that support his claims.

“[In] a number of cases, these things have landed on military bases. ... Servicemen have approached them and they get traumatic brain injury, or they’re killed,” Carlson said on the podcast. “I’m like, why isn’t this on the front page of the New York Times? I don’t know.”

The U.S. military, meanwhile, is having no part of this particular UFO discussion.

“That story is false,” Susan Gough, a Defense Department spokesperson, told Military Times. The Pentagon declined to comment further.

UFOs have become a hot-button topic among military officials in recent months.

In fact, last week, the head of the Pentagon’s All-domain Anomaly Resolution Office drafted a report suggesting alien vessels could indeed be sending out search probes throughout our solar system.

“[A]n artificial interstellar object could potentially be a parent craft that releases many small probes during its close passage to Earth, an operational construct not too dissimilar from NASA missions,” Sean Kirkpatrick wrote in the report co-authored by Abraham Loeb, chairman of Harvard University’s astronomy department.

Named “Physical Constraints on Unidentified Aerial Phenomena,” the research paper was published after weeks of heightened reporting on unidentified aerial phenomena after a Chinese spy balloon traversed U.S. airspace.

Observation Post is the Military Times one-stop shop for all things off-duty. Stories may reflect author observations.

Sarah Sicard is a Senior Editor with Military Times. She previously served as the Digitial Editor of Military Times and the Army Times Editor. Other work can be found at National Defense Magazine, Task & Purpose, and Defense News.

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