The president may be commander in chief, but it's members of Congress who decide how much money is spent on the military and what programs to fund. And unlike presidents, who are only around no more than eight years, representatives and senators are often around in office far longer.

But even the most steadfast congressman eventually leaves office, usually either by a choice they make or a choice their constituents make.

The 114th Congress, which ends this year, is no different, according to the House Press Gallery. As of June 24, the House has 247 Republicans and 187 Democrats (there is one vacancy). Of those, 20 Republicans and 9 Democrats announced that they aren't seeking reelection (not included are representatives who are running for other offices):

DEMOCRATS

  • Lois Capps, California
  • Sam Farr, California
  • Gwen Graham, Florida
  • Janice Hahn, California
  • Rubén Hinojosa, Texas
  • Steve Israel, New York (member of the House Appropriations Defense subcommittee)
  • Jim McDermott, Washington
  • Charles Rangel, New York
  • Mark Takai, Hawaii (member of the House Armed Services Committee)

REPUBLICANS

  • Dan Benishek, Michigan
  • Curt Clawson, Florida
  • Ander Crenshaw, Florida (member of the House Appropriations Defense subcommittee)
  • Stephen Fincher, Tennessee
  • Michael Fitzpatrick, Pennsylvania
  • Chris Gibson, New York (member of the House Armed Services Committee)
  • Richard Hanna, New York
  • Robert Hurt, Virginia
  • John Kline, Minnesota (member of the House Armed Services Committee)
  • Cynthia Lummis, Wyoming
  • Candice Miller, Michigan
  • Jeff Miller, Florida (member of the House Armed Services Committee)
  • Randy Neugebauer, Texas
  • Richard Nugent, Florida (member of the House Armed Services Committee)
  • Jospeh Pitts, Pennsylvania
  • Scott Rigell, Virginia
  • Reid Ribble, Wisconsin
  • Matt Salmon, Arizona
  • Lynn Westmoreland, Georgia
  • Ed Whitfield, Kentucky

So far, one three representatives — one Democrat and two Republicans — have lost in primary elections:

DEMOCRATS

  • Chaka Fattah, Pennsylvania

REPUBLICANS

  • Ellmers, North Carolina
  • Forbes, Virginia (member of the House Armed Services Committee)

Fattah not only lost his reelection primary, he's also the only Democrat to resign so far from the 114th Congress, as have three Republicans:

DEMOCRATS

  • Chaka Fattah, Pennsylvania

REPUBLICANS

  • Michael Grimm, New York
  • Aaron Schock, Illinois
  • John Boehner, Ohio

On the other side of the Capitol, where Senate membership tends to be a little more stable, three Democrats and one Republican have announced that they aren't seeking reelection (another Republican, Sen. Marco Rubio, had said while he was running for president that he wouldn't seek another Senate term, but announced this month that he is running for reelection):

DEMOCRATS

  • Barbara Boxer, California
  • Barbara Mikulski, Maryland (member of the Senate Appropriations Defense subcommittee)
  • Harry Reid, Nevada


REPUBLICANS

  • Dan Coats, Indiana